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Entries from August 2007

ADHD and Street Drugs

August 7th, 2007 · No Comments

Researchers have generally known that people with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) are more likely than others to smoke cigarettes and abuse alcohol, marijuana, cocaine and other street drugs.

In a recent study, a team led by Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the NIH’s National Institute on Drug Abuse, documented decreased dopamine activity in the brains of a group of adults with ADHD. Dopamine is associated with feeling good.

The researchers compared brain scans on 19 adults with ADHD — average age 32 — who had never received medication for the condition to brain scans of 24 healthy adults of a similar age without ADHD.

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Tags: Drugs and Brain Disorders · Street Drugs

Marijuana More Harmful Than Cigarettes According To Research Study

August 3rd, 2007 · No Comments

A recent research report published in Thorax – An International Journal of Respiratory Medicine, stated that “one cannabis joint causes a similar degree of lung damage as between 2.5 and five tobacco cigarettes“.

The three year study by New Zealand’s Medical Research Institute (mrinz.ac.nz) found that longtime pot smokers can develop symptoms of asthma and bronchitis, along with obstruction of the large airways and excessive lung inflation.

Marijuana smokers had symptoms that included wheezing, coughing, chest tightness and phlegm – all of which were associated with tobacco smokers, except chest tightness.

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Tags: Marijuana Addiction

Marijuana and Psychosis

August 2nd, 2007 · No Comments

marijuana plant

Marijuana is the most frequently used illegal substance in many countries, including the United Kingdom and the United States and it seems to increase the chance of becoming psychotic, researchers report in an analysis of past research that brings up the old issue of whether pot is dangerous.

The new review suggests that even infrequent use of marijuana could raise the small but real risk of this serious mental illness by 40 percent.

Doctors have long suspected a connection and say the latest findings underline the need to highlight marijuana’s long-term risks. The research, paid for by the British Health Department, was published recently in the medical journal The Lancet. (thelancet.com)

“The available evidence now suggests that cannabis is not as harmless as many people think,” said Dr. Stanley Zammit, one of the study’s authors and a lecturer in the department of psychological medicine at Cardiff University.

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Tags: Marijuana Addiction