Addiction Solution Source

Marijuana and Meth: Treatment That Works

November 16th, 2007 · No Comments

Julia holds an M.A. in Clinical Psychology, as well as a California marriage and family therapy license and has frequently appeared as an expert on radio and television programs. She is the author of The Mood Cure, a brain repair manual for mood and addiction problems, and the best selling The Diet Cure on recovery from carbohydrate addiction. She also presents training seminars in amino acid therapy for treatment of chemical dependency.

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Tags: Drug Addiction Alternative Treatment

Consequences of Addiction: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

November 6th, 2007 · No Comments

Dr Charles GantCharles Gant, MD, PhD, is a leading orthomolecular physician who has practiced complementary medicine for over 30 years. Dr. Gant is nationally recognized for devising nutritional and detoxification interventions for nicotine, alcohol and substance abuse, ADHD along with other common, chronic medical and psychological problems.

Dr. Gant has also authored or coauthored books such as: “End Your Addiction Now”, and “End Nicotine Addiction Now”.

He recently gave a presentation at the Beyond Talk Therapy: New Frontiers in Addiction Treatment Symposium in Sacramento, California. His topic: Introduction to Integrative Addictionology – The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly. The video presentation is a ‘must see’ for anyone who wants to learn about effective treatment without drugs.

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Tags: Drug Addiction Alternative Treatment

Brain Neurotransmitters and Addiction

September 5th, 2007 · No Comments

Electrical signals in the brain are sent using chemicals called neurotransmitters. All addictive drugs affect the production, release, or elimination of neurotransmitters. The major Neurotransmitters implicated in addiction are noted below.

Serotonin

Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT) is synthesized from dietary tryptophan and its primary function is regulation of sleep and mood. Low levels of serotonin have been associated with mood disorders such as depression.

Medications called specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as Prozac and Zoloft, increase serotonin levels but can be very dangerous. You should consider taking the essential amino acid trytophan instead. Check with a holistic doctor for advice.

Norepinephrine (NE)

NE’s common function is associated with arousal and alertness. It is synthesized from the essential amino acid tyrosine. The levels of NE fluctuate throughout the day and therefore there are periods when we feel more awake and alert, while at other times we are tired and sleepy.

Certain drugs of abuse, such as stimulants or “uppers”, increase alertness and arousal and cause talkativeness, restlessness, and agitation because of their action on NE systems.

Dopamine

Dopamine release gives us the experience of pleasure and therefore causes us to want to repeat the behaviors necessary to acquire the reward in the future.

It’s interesting that amphetamine and cocaine both increase the amount of dopamine. However, cocaine achieves this action by preventing dopamine reuptake, while amphetamine helps to release more dopamine.

So, these drugs with similar effects produce their actions through entirely different processes. In turn, addiction to the two drugs may call for somewhat different types of addiction treatment.

GABA

Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is synthesized from glutamate (an amino acid) and is found in very high concentrations throughout the brain. It is considered an “inhibitory neurotransmitter”. Because GABA has inhibitory effects on neurons, any drug that increases the actions of GABA will decrease general brain activity and can be considered a “downer” or depressant. Depressants include alcohol, sleeping pills such as Ambien, muscle relaxants such as Valium, and barbiturates such as Secobarbital. Some depressants are very powerful and can cause coma or death.

The Most Addictive Drugs

Different drugs have different effects on the neurotransmitters. For instance, cocaine and methamphetamine are much more addicting than THC (marijuana) because they increase dopamine levels more quickly and to a greater extent.

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Tags: Drugs and Brain Disorders · Street Drugs

Amino Acid Therapy – What is it?

May 23rd, 2007 · No Comments

Neurotransmitter Restoration (NTR) is the restoration and re-balancing of normal neurotransmission in the brain through IV amino acids and is one way to overcome a drug addiction. Thousands of people have successfully used this program to beat their addiction.

Drugs, whether prescription drugs (pain pills, antidepressants, stimulants, or benzodiazepines such as Ativan, Valium, Xanax, or Klonopin), alcohol, tobacco, or street drugs (methamphetamine, cocaine, heroin, marijuana, ecstasy, LSD, PCP and others) have something in common: they all overstimulate certain neurotransmitter receptors (nerves) in the brain. This is how they bring about their effects, but it is also how they cause lasting damage that leads to deeper addiction and the inability to handle the stresses of normal life.

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Tags: Drug Addiction Alternative Treatment

Alternative Treatment International

May 15th, 2007 · No Comments

Here is one addiction treatment resource that may be helpful in solving your health condition.


Drug Addiction and Alcoholism can be devastating for the individual and family alike. Not only does the Addicted individual suffer, but the direct family will have their lives turned upside down, becoming drained emotionally and physically, and usually, the problem accompanies serious financial loss. For many years Drug and Alcohol Addiction Treatment Programs have primarily been focused on a 12 Step method. In fact, 97% of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Programs surveyed include the twelve-step process.

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Tags: Drug Addiction Alternative Treatment

Addiction Psychiatrist Offers Free Information On Alcohol Addiction Options

May 9th, 2007 · No Comments

Here is a news note that may be helpful for someone in need:

July 19, 2006 — Addiction Psychiatrist and addiction expert offers no cost, no obligation information on alcoholism recovery and alcohol addiction treatment options. Five (5) part mini-course at www.alcoholism-treatment-recovery.com.

Also offers free call-in times to answer questions about alcoholism treatment and recovery options. Any question on addiction will be answered directly by Stephen Gilman, M.D. Anyone interested should call 212-229-2503 on Wednesdays or Saturdays between 8 AM and 9 AM EST.  

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Tags: Drug Addiction Alternative Treatment

Cocain and Crack

May 6th, 2007 · No Comments

Pure cocaine was first used in the 1880s in eye, nose, and throat surgeries as an anesthetic and for its ability to constrict blood vessels and limit bleeding. However, many of its therapeutic applications are now obsolete because of the development of safer drugs.

Cocaine is extracted from the leaves of the coca plant, which is indigenous to the Andean highlands of South America. Much of the cocaine available in the United States is transported from South American nations, particularly Colombia, through the Mexico-Central America Corridor.

Cocaine was first Federally-regulated in December 1914 with the passage of the Harrison Act. This Act banned non-medical use of cocaine; prohibited its importation; imposed the same criminal penalties for cocaine users as for opium, morphine, and heroin users; and required a strict accounting of medical prescriptions for it. As a result of the Harrison Act and the emergence of cheaper, legal substances such as amphetamines, cocaine became less used in the U.S. However, use began to rise again in the 1960s, prompting Congress to classify it as a Schedule II substance in 1970.

Schedule II substances have a high potential for abuse, a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States with severe restrictions, and may lead to severe psychological or physical dependence. Cocaine can currently be administered by a doctor for legitimate medical uses, such as a local anesthetic for some eye, ear, and throat surgeries.

There are basically two chemical forms of cocaine: the hydrochloride salt and the freebase. The hydrochloride salt, or powdered form of cocaine, dissolves in water and, when abused, can be taken intravenously (by vein) or intranasally (in the nose). Freebase refers to a compound that has not been neutralized by an acid to make the hydrochloride salt. The freebase form of cocaine is smokable.

Cocaine is generally sold on the street as a fine, white, crystalline powder, known as coke, C, snow, flake, or blow. It has been reported that it is common for dealers to dilute the powder with chalk, laundry detergent, baby powder and rat poison! Can you imagine anyone trying street drugs with this possibility?

Crack

Crack is the street name given to a freebase form of cocaine that has been processed from the powdered cocaine hydrochloride form to a smokable substance. The term “crack” comes from the crackling sound made when it is heated.

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Tags: Street Drugs

Prescription Drug Abuse

May 5th, 2007 · No Comments

According to a National Institute on Drug Abuse research report, there are three classes of prescription drugs that are most commonly abused:

1- opioids, which are most often prescribed to treat pain – examples include: codeine, oxycodone (OxyContin and Percocet), and morphine (Kadian and Avinza);

2- central nervous system (CNS) depressants, which are used to treat anxiety and sleep disorders – examples include: barbiturates (Mebaral and Nembutal) and benzodiazepines (Valium and Xanax);

3- stimulants, which are prescribed to treat the sleep disorder narcolepsy, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and obesity – examples include: dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine and Adderall) and methylphenidate (Ritalin and Concerta).

Many people benefit from the appropriate use of prescription pain killers, but, when abused, they can be as addictive and dangerous as illegal drugs. Prescription drugs should only be taken exactly as directed by a medical professional.

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Tags: Drug Addiction Alternative Treatment · Prescription Drugs Addiction

Alcohol Addiction and Hypoglycemia

April 29th, 2007 · No Comments

Alcohol addiction is basically a sugar addiction. Hypoglycemia ( low blood sugar) is a factor for about 95 percent of alcoholics, and it may well be a major cause of alcoholism.

Alcohol is the ultimate refined carbohydrate, capable of elevating blood sugar levels even faster than white sugar. Consuming alcohol gives a temporary rise in blood sugar so the drinker feels relaxed and energized. When blood sugar drops, the person wants more. It is highly recommended that you take a lab test for hypoglycemia to help analyze your condition.

Brigitte Mars, author of Addiction-Free Naturally, states that when you quit drinking, it’s essential that you feed your body a cleansing, healthy diet that supplies the nutrients it needs to recover from alcohol abuse. It is important to keep the body’s blood sugar level stable by eating small, frequent meals. Avoid sugar, sweets, sweetened fruit juices, caffeine, and refined carbohydrates such as breads and pasta. Eat plenty of vegetables and whole grains and drink plenty of water.

When you have a craving for alcohol, try any of the following foods:

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Tags: Alcohol Addiction · Drug Addiction Alternative Treatment · Sugar Addiction

Fruits, Veggies and Dairy May Help Smokers Quit

April 25th, 2007 · No Comments

This information was recently released from Duke University:

Smokers reported that consuming milk, water, fruits and vegetables worsened the taste of cigarettes, while consuming alcohol, coffee and meat enhanced their taste, according to the researchers at Duke University Medical Center.

The findings could lead to a “Quit Smoking Diet” or to development of a gum or lozenge that makes cigarettes less palatable, said lead study investigator Joseph McClernon, Ph.D., an assistant research professor of medical psychiatry at the Duke Center for Nicotine and Smoking Cessation Research.

“With a few modifications to their diet — consuming items that make cigarettes taste bad, such as a cold glass of milk, and avoiding items that make cigarettes taste good, like a pint of beer — smokers can make quitting a bit easier,” McClernon said.

The findings appear in the April 2007 issue of the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research. The research was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

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Tags: Drug Addiction Alternative Treatment · Smoking - Nicotine Addiction