Addiction Solution Source

Chiropractic Treatments Effective in Treating Drug Abuse

September 25th, 2008 · No Comments

The word “chiropractic” gets its’ name from the Greek words chiros and praktikos which means “done by hand”. Chiropractors diagnose and treat the misalignment of the spine and the resulting mechanical disorders that affect the nervous system and hinder good health.

In 1895, Daniel David Palmer (Father of Chiropractic) asserted that 95% of all health problems could be treated, or even prevented with spinal adjustments. This statement is based on his theory that misaligned vertebrae (subluxations) impede the function of the nervous system thus contributing to a wide variety of health issues.

Chiropractors locate these subluxations and, through gentle adjustments, restore the body’s normal functions. With the vertebra in place, the nerve passages open and regulatory impulses are free to pass allowing the body’s nervous system to heal itself. This method goes directly to the root of the problem. It does not mask symptoms like addictive prescription drugs often do.

A large-scale human study, dealing specifically with the area of drug addictions, affirmed the validity and effectiveness of chiropractic adjustments. Conducted by Dr. Jay Holder with the University of Miami School of Medicine and the Florida Chiropractic Society, the study showed dramatic results. The 18-month project demonstrated that those patients receiving these special treatments saw an almost 100% retention rate. The rate of retention, or how long a person stays in treatment, is vital because completion of a well-established and supported program assures a high success rate.

The “torque release technique”, developed by Dr. Holder, treats addiction by removing the subluxations band realigning the vertebrae. This, Dr. Holder asserts, “removes the interference with the normal functioning of the nervous system.” When the spine is misaligned, it interrupts the sequence of chemical changes necessary to maintain health and well-being. When the natural flow is interrupted, it results in what Dr. Holder calls “reward deficiency syndrome” and the body seeks the feeling of well being elsewhere.

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Tags: Drug Addiction Alternative Treatment

Brain Neurotransmitters and Addiction

September 5th, 2007 · No Comments

Electrical signals in the brain are sent using chemicals called neurotransmitters. All addictive drugs affect the production, release, or elimination of neurotransmitters. The major Neurotransmitters implicated in addiction are noted below.

Serotonin

Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT) is synthesized from dietary tryptophan and its primary function is regulation of sleep and mood. Low levels of serotonin have been associated with mood disorders such as depression.

Medications called specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as Prozac and Zoloft, increase serotonin levels but can be very dangerous. You should consider taking the essential amino acid trytophan instead. Check with a holistic doctor for advice.

Norepinephrine (NE)

NE’s common function is associated with arousal and alertness. It is synthesized from the essential amino acid tyrosine. The levels of NE fluctuate throughout the day and therefore there are periods when we feel more awake and alert, while at other times we are tired and sleepy.

Certain drugs of abuse, such as stimulants or “uppers”, increase alertness and arousal and cause talkativeness, restlessness, and agitation because of their action on NE systems.

Dopamine

Dopamine release gives us the experience of pleasure and therefore causes us to want to repeat the behaviors necessary to acquire the reward in the future.

It’s interesting that amphetamine and cocaine both increase the amount of dopamine. However, cocaine achieves this action by preventing dopamine reuptake, while amphetamine helps to release more dopamine.

So, these drugs with similar effects produce their actions through entirely different processes. In turn, addiction to the two drugs may call for somewhat different types of addiction treatment.

GABA

Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is synthesized from glutamate (an amino acid) and is found in very high concentrations throughout the brain. It is considered an “inhibitory neurotransmitter”. Because GABA has inhibitory effects on neurons, any drug that increases the actions of GABA will decrease general brain activity and can be considered a “downer” or depressant. Depressants include alcohol, sleeping pills such as Ambien, muscle relaxants such as Valium, and barbiturates such as Secobarbital. Some depressants are very powerful and can cause coma or death.

The Most Addictive Drugs

Different drugs have different effects on the neurotransmitters. For instance, cocaine and methamphetamine are much more addicting than THC (marijuana) because they increase dopamine levels more quickly and to a greater extent.

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Tags: Drugs and Brain Disorders · Street Drugs

Alternative Treatment International

May 15th, 2007 · No Comments

Here is one addiction treatment resource that may be helpful in solving your health condition.


Drug Addiction and Alcoholism can be devastating for the individual and family alike. Not only does the Addicted individual suffer, but the direct family will have their lives turned upside down, becoming drained emotionally and physically, and usually, the problem accompanies serious financial loss. For many years Drug and Alcohol Addiction Treatment Programs have primarily been focused on a 12 Step method. In fact, 97% of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Programs surveyed include the twelve-step process.

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Tags: Drug Addiction Alternative Treatment

Drug and Alcohol Treatment Center Provides Holistic Addiction Recovery Options to a Variety of Addicts

May 11th, 2007 · No Comments

I have included health articles on this website to give you additional information and resources to help solve your health condition. 

by: Jerry Goldfarb

Addiction is something regularly discussed in the news, and lately has been no exception. From Representative Kennedys addiction, to Hillary Swank discussing addiction as a reason for her divorce from actor Chad Lowe, drug and alcohol addiction has become almost a daily fixture in the media. Giordano and Goldfarbs Holistic Addiction Treatment Center  hopes to provide assistance to individuals suffering from addictions such as those, using their 17 years of experience in holistic addiction rehabilitation.

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Tags: Drug Addiction Alternative Treatment

Marijuana Facts

May 7th, 2007 · No Comments

Marijuana is the most frequently used illegal drug in the United States. It is a green, brown, or gray mixture of dried, shredded leaves, stems, seeds, and flowers of the hemp plant. It is called by numerous street names such as pot, herb, weed, grass, boom, Mary Jane, gangster, or chronic. There are also names for different strains or “brands” of marijuana, such as “Texas tea,” “Maui wowie,” and “Chronic.”

Most users roll loose marijuana into a cigarette (called a joint or a nail) or smoke it in a pipe. One well-known type of water pipe is the bong. Some users mix marijuana into foods or use it to brew a tea.

Another method is to slice open a cigar and replace the tobacco with marijuana, making what’s called a blunt. Some blunts include crack cocaine, a combination known by various street names, such as “primos” or “woolies.” Joints and blunts often are dipped in PCP and are called “happy sticks,” “wicky sticks,” or “love boat.” One book of American slang lists more than 200 terms for various kinds of marijuana.

Why do People use Marijuana?

Curiosity and the desire to fit into a social group are common reasons to use the drug. Certainly, youngsters who have already begun to smoke cigarettes and/or use alcohol are at high risk for marijuana use.

Research suggests that the use of alcohol and drugs by other family members plays a strong role in whether children start using drugs. Some young people who take drugs do not get along with their parents. Some have a network of friends who use drugs and urge them to do the same (peer pressure). All aspects of a child’s environment – home, school, neighborhood – help to determine whether the child will try drugs.

Young people who become more heavily involved with marijuana can become dependent, making it difficult for them to quit. Others mention psychological coping as a reason for their use – to deal with anxiety, anger, depression, boredom, and so forth. But marijuana use is not an effective method for coping with life’s problems, and staying high can be a way of simply not dealing with the problems and challenges of growing up.

Health Effects of The Drug

All forms of marijuana are mind-altering and it changes how the brain works. It contains THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol), the main active chemical in marijuana. It also contains more than 400 other chemicals. Marijuana’s effects on the user depend on it’s strength or potency, which is related to the amount of THC it contains. The THC content has been increasing since the 1970s.

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Tags: Marijuana Addiction

Prescription Drug Abuse

May 5th, 2007 · No Comments

According to a National Institute on Drug Abuse research report, there are three classes of prescription drugs that are most commonly abused:

1- opioids, which are most often prescribed to treat pain – examples include: codeine, oxycodone (OxyContin and Percocet), and morphine (Kadian and Avinza);

2- central nervous system (CNS) depressants, which are used to treat anxiety and sleep disorders – examples include: barbiturates (Mebaral and Nembutal) and benzodiazepines (Valium and Xanax);

3- stimulants, which are prescribed to treat the sleep disorder narcolepsy, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and obesity – examples include: dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine and Adderall) and methylphenidate (Ritalin and Concerta).

Many people benefit from the appropriate use of prescription pain killers, but, when abused, they can be as addictive and dangerous as illegal drugs. Prescription drugs should only be taken exactly as directed by a medical professional.

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Tags: Drug Addiction Alternative Treatment · Prescription Drugs Addiction

Does Drug Abuse Cause Mental Disorders, or Vice Versa?

April 28th, 2007 · No Comments

Drug abuse and brain disorders often co-exist. In some cases, mental diseases may precede addiction; in other cases, drug abuse may trigger or exacerbate mental disorders, particularly in individuals with specific vulnerabilities.

What are the medical consequences of drug addiction?

Individuals who suffer from addiction often have one or more accompanying medical issues, including lung and cardiovascular disease, stroke, cancer, and mental disorders. Imaging scans, chest x-rays, and blood tests show the damaging effects of drug abuse throughout the body. For example, tests show that smoking causes cancer of the mouth, throat, larynx, blood, lungs, stomach, pancreas, kidney, bladder, and cervix. In addition, some drugs of abuse, such as inhalants, are toxic to nerve cells and may damage or destroy them either in the brain or the peripheral nervous system.

What harmful consequences to others result from drug addiction?

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Tags: Drugs and Brain Disorders · Smoking - Nicotine Addiction

What Factors Increase The Risk of Addiction?

April 23rd, 2007 · No Comments

What environmental factors increase the risk of addiction?

Home and Family. The influence of the home environment is usually most important in childhood. Parents or older family members who abuse alcohol or drugs, or who engage in criminal behavior, can increase children’s risks of developing their own drug abuse problems.

Peer and School. Friends and acquaintances have the greatest influence during adolescence. Drug-abusing peers can sway even those without risk factors to try drugs for the first time. Academic failure or poor social skills can put a child further at risk for drug abuse.

 

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Tags: Drug Abuse

Why do some people become addicted to drugs, while others do not?

April 22nd, 2007 · No Comments

Vulnerability to addiction differs from person to person. In general, the more risk factors an individual has, the greater the chance that taking prescription drugs or street drugs will lead to abuse and addiction. “Protective” factors reduce a person’s risk of developing addiction.

What factors determine if a person will become addicted?

No single factor determines whether a person will become addicted to drugs. The overall risk for addiction is impacted by the biological makeup of the individual – it can even be influenced by gender or ethnicity, his or her developmental stage, and the surrounding social environment (e.g., conditions at home, at school, and in the neighborhood).
Which biological factors increase risk of addiction?

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Tags: Prescription Drugs Addiction · Street Drugs

Smoking Health Hazards

April 14th, 2007 · No Comments

Since 1964, 28 Surgeon General’s reports on smoking and health have concluded that tobacco use is the single most avoidable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. In 1988, the Surgeon General concluded that cigarettes and other forms of tobacco, such as cigars, pipe tobacco, and chewing tobacco, are addictive and that nicotine is the drug in tobacco that causes addiction. Nicotine provides an almost immediate “kick” because it causes a discharge of epinephrine from the adrenal cortex. This stimulates the central nervous system and endocrine glands, which causes a sudden release of glucose. Stimulation is then followed by depression and fatigue, leading the user to seek more nicotine.

Nicotine is absorbed readily from tobacco smoke in the lungs, and it does not matter whether the tobacco smoke is from cigarettes, cigars, or pipes. Nicotine also is absorbed readily when tobacco is chewed. With regular use of tobacco, levels of nicotine accumulate in the body during the day and persist overnight. Thus, daily smokers or chewers are exposed to the effects of nicotine for 24 hours each day. Adolescents who chew tobacco are more likely than nonusers to eventually become cigarette smokers.

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Tags: Smoking - Nicotine Addiction