Addiction Solution Source

Drugs, Alcohol and ADD

July 15th, 2007 · No Comments

Drug and alcohol abuse are very common among teenagers and adults with untreated ADD Attention Deficit Disorder. One study by psychiatrist Joseph Biederman and his colleagues at Harvard University indicated that 52 percent of untreated ADD adults abuse drugs or alcohol.

The drugs that they choose to abuse are alcohol and marijuana to settle the internal restlessness they feel, and cocaine and methaphetamines to feel more energetic and focused. Nicotine use (cigarettes, cigars, and chewing tobacco) is much more common in people with ADD, as is the intake of large amounts of caffeine. Nicotine and caffeine are mild stimulants.

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Tags: Alcohol Addiction · Drugs and Brain Disorders · Marijuana Addiction

The Dry Drunk Syndrome and Hypoglycemia

May 21st, 2007 · No Comments

Dry-drunk is a term used, often disparagingly, by members of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and by substance abuse counselors to describe the recovering alcoholic who is no longer drinking but who still demonstrates the same alcoholic behaviors and attitudes.

Studies have shown that up to 90% of alcoholics are hypoglycemic (low blood sugar). According to Joan Mathews Larson, author of Seven Weeks To Sobriety, the dry-drunk symptoms are similar to people with hypoglycemia.  They include:

-irritability
-depression
-aggressiveness
-insomnia
-fatigue
-restlessness
-confusion
-desire to drink
-nervousness

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Tags: Alcohol Addiction · Drug Addiction Alternative Treatment · Sugar Addiction

Cocain and Crack

May 6th, 2007 · No Comments

Pure cocaine was first used in the 1880s in eye, nose, and throat surgeries as an anesthetic and for its ability to constrict blood vessels and limit bleeding. However, many of its therapeutic applications are now obsolete because of the development of safer drugs.

Cocaine is extracted from the leaves of the coca plant, which is indigenous to the Andean highlands of South America. Much of the cocaine available in the United States is transported from South American nations, particularly Colombia, through the Mexico-Central America Corridor.

Cocaine was first Federally-regulated in December 1914 with the passage of the Harrison Act. This Act banned non-medical use of cocaine; prohibited its importation; imposed the same criminal penalties for cocaine users as for opium, morphine, and heroin users; and required a strict accounting of medical prescriptions for it. As a result of the Harrison Act and the emergence of cheaper, legal substances such as amphetamines, cocaine became less used in the U.S. However, use began to rise again in the 1960s, prompting Congress to classify it as a Schedule II substance in 1970.

Schedule II substances have a high potential for abuse, a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States with severe restrictions, and may lead to severe psychological or physical dependence. Cocaine can currently be administered by a doctor for legitimate medical uses, such as a local anesthetic for some eye, ear, and throat surgeries.

There are basically two chemical forms of cocaine: the hydrochloride salt and the freebase. The hydrochloride salt, or powdered form of cocaine, dissolves in water and, when abused, can be taken intravenously (by vein) or intranasally (in the nose). Freebase refers to a compound that has not been neutralized by an acid to make the hydrochloride salt. The freebase form of cocaine is smokable.

Cocaine is generally sold on the street as a fine, white, crystalline powder, known as coke, C, snow, flake, or blow. It has been reported that it is common for dealers to dilute the powder with chalk, laundry detergent, baby powder and rat poison! Can you imagine anyone trying street drugs with this possibility?

Crack

Crack is the street name given to a freebase form of cocaine that has been processed from the powdered cocaine hydrochloride form to a smokable substance. The term “crack” comes from the crackling sound made when it is heated.

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Tags: Street Drugs

Alternative Medicine Solutions For Drug Addictions

May 3rd, 2007 · No Comments

This site is focused on the most current alternative and natural health treatments for alcohol addiction, smoking, sugar addiction and drugs, both prescription drugs and street drugs. Frequently these addictions are inter-related and people have more than one substance that they are addicted to.

Research shows that conventional counseling and 12 Step programs have low success rates for the long term. What we support is a holistic health approach. “Holistic” means that the addiction treatment program is designed to treat the whole person, not just the symptoms of substance abuse. By treating the entire person – body, mind, and spirit, you have the best chance of success.

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Tags: Drug Addiction Alternative Treatment